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  • #8852
    etilley
    Keymaster

    Why is Academia failing to teach us how to build a Sustainable Society?

    Academia is doing a dreadful job of aligning curriculums with a sustainable society presently – faculty by faculty (even in engineering) and its been going on like this for more than 150-years. With more than 68% of nations collapse-trending with negative trade balances, statistically a chimp with a dartboard has a higher percentage chance of picking successful policies than a trained economist.

    The downward leadership arrow in the photograph above sums us up pretty well. When you are headed for a cliff with momentum, slowing down doesn’t help, and neither do minor course corrections. It takes a precise 180-degree turnaround and then a substantial correcting effort too, to save yourself from crashing over the edge.

    Today we can think of research as spending – and not investing. Picture a firecracker igniting with energy in every direction and then never amounting to anything – and here we have contemporary non-science faculties in academia.

    Collapse is expensive and avoidable, so you don’t want congratulate nor revere agent of collapse; quite the contrary it true in fact. Examples of failing faculties include:

    Economics – FDR built the American Dream and greatest economy of all time in a mature capitalism – but you won’t find any work to bolster nor support this reality in an economics curriculum. Failed economies create a powderkeg of international tension that any spark can turn, and has turned, into a World War reliably. Despite this, sociopaths like Milton Friedman and Anne Rice still hold high places in unsustainable curriculums here.

    Business – do I have to explain the implications of a 1.4 to 1.8 unsustainable birthrate and the cost of stalled economies worldwide? Hiring practices that encourage starvation wages, anti-nationalist – offshoring and onshoring, sexism, racism, ageism, double income traps, and family-pension squandering. See an index of nations that maintain social balance at the SCP Index – http://csq1.org/SCP

    Social Sciences – every Marshall Plan nation, that also adopted FDR’s Second Bill of Rights in their Constitution, has an advancing economy today. Italy, Japan, Germany, Austria, Finland, the Netherlands… these countries have six-week vacations, workers choose their boards and executives, immigrants enter when they bring 5-new jobs each, these countries have great schools – with free university in many cases, great healthcare, in-home nursing, maternity leave, and much lower taxes the private insurance schemes. Our Academia are not raising alarms and they are not correcting our curriculums nor democracies. Why does mediocrity flourish in settings of supposedly high-intelligence? Peer-reviewed consensus in theory isn’t science, its fiction. Problem-solving is more important than memorization, but problem solvers and new sciences appear completely marginalized in this setting.

    Meanwhile, our Social Sciences ignore Philosophy and Epistemology (expert systems and process) – specifically Socratic Method’s best-practice of disambiguation. This group teaches “isms” and unimportant terms which are also weaponizable due to their ambiguity. New sciences, are having to evolve external to academia, like Transition Economics which deprecates most “isms”, LiberalConservativerightleft, etc. because these terms are ambiguous and also meaningless according to surveys of real economies. See a responsible USE CASE and Terms reference for the Monetary System here.

    These shortfalls are dangerous and expensive. Low Social Contracts here in North America cost the U.S. economy $30 billion dollars a day – or a staggering $12.4 trillion per year (more than all of its trade today). Canada loses $1.0 trillion annually.

    Poor leadership, slow adoption of science – and a requirement of concensus (peer review) – appears to be a big part of the problem here. It took Einstein’s Theory of Relativity 20-years to be accepted in the West; he was a Patent Clerk for 8-years because no University would sponsor an individual who was arguably the most brilliant mind of the 20th Century.

    Solutions to Academias problems exist – but are absolutely ignored. See Transition Economics and  http://sustainsocieties.com/TASK

    Anyone who imagines and proves a brilliant new science today is shut-out by most credentialing processes – and such a candidate is unable to defend their theses and ideas; I can speak firsthand to this reality. This is certainly true in Canada and in most Universities worldwide, and most pronounced in low Social Contract nations.

    Academic Institutions have to get their leadership mortarboards back on straight – and only then can they be treated with the reverence they’ve become too accustomed to today. A robust, sustainable economy and society is Academia’s first priority, although you would never know it to visit a local campus.

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